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Sedentary Lifestyle Linked to Diabetes

A quick glance over the course of human history evidences one great fact about the human body: it was built to move. Our early ancestors were nearly always on the move, and even as recently as 150 years ago, our agrarian society incorporated full body movement as part of the regular work day.

However, in the last 60 years, workers in the United States have progressively become more and more sedentary. Not just in their office work, but in their homes as well. In fact, some studies report that the average American adult spends between 9-12 hours a day simply sitting.

And we are paying for this shift in lifestyle, not with our wallets, but with our health. Type 2 diabetes – often called adult onset diabetes – is one of the most common forms of diseases on the rise in our country today, and health providers maintain that it is reaching epidemic proportions. The cause? Sedentary lifestyle, with its resulting lack of exercise and physical movement.

The Impact of Sitting On Our Body

The body uses glucose for energy, but when a sedentary lifestyle is the norm and high calorie foods are the principal diet, the body stores excess as fat rather than burning it off through physical exertion. Although genetics also play a part, obesity contributes to the inability to utilize the insulin produced by the body, or to produce any insulin at all. This results in high glucose levels in the blood eventually creating organ or blood vessel damage, heart attack, stroke and other health issues.

What has precipitated the sedentary lifestyle that’s so predominate in advanced cultures and what can be done about it? A number of factors come into play:

The Advent of the Industrial Revolution

The invention of the cotton gin, by Eli Whitney, began the Industrial Revolution in the US. At the time, no one realized the massive change that machinery created in human health. In the past, long hours spent laboring in the fields or herding livestock were typical. However, after the Industrial Revolution, people worked in factories or offices, and mostly stood or sat. Calories expended became less over the decades, and obesity and diabetes rose.

Henry Ford’s Contribution

To make matters worse – at least in terms of physical health – the invention of the automobile changed the world of transportation. Certainly, no one would argue the advantages of the piston engine, or its impact for allowing food and goods to be transported great distances. However, personal transportation by auto superseded walking – particularly walking long distances. The physiological benefits of physical movement – which included burning glucose and thereby reducing the risk of Type 2 diabetes – were lost.

The article, “Type 2 Diabetes: Risk Factors,” by the Mayo Clinic staff states:

“The less active you are, the greater your risk of type 2 diabetes. Physical activity helps you control your weight, uses up glucose as energy and makes your cells more sensitive to insulin.”

Philo Farnsworth’s Invention

If the above factors weren’t enough, one other change greatly impacted human health: the television. Many decry the TV as one of the biggest causes for the rise in Type 2 diabetes.

Americans spend significant amounts of leisure time watching TV, with some researchers suggesting we spend as much as 5 hours a day glued to the tube. A study mentioned in the Journal of the American Medical Association sheds light on this alarming trend and the impact it has on our health:

“While the associations between time spent viewing TV and risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease were linear, the risk of all-cause mortality appeared to increase with TV viewing duration of greater than 3 hours per day.”

Even the most diehard TV watchers can’t deny that sitting in front of the tube is damaging their health and creating a risk to life.

Solutions

In light of such facts, what can our culture do to stem the rising tide? The solution is simple; we must sit less and move more. However, living in a work and leisure culture that is primarily oriented toward sitting requires some effort to find ways to incorporate more movement into your routine.

Solutions At Home

When working to overcome a sedentary lifestyle at home, quite simply, you should just turn off the TV and walk. Walk for recreation, for exercise, and as a method of transportation.  According to the Mayo Clinic, walking can:

 “Reduce your risk of or manage type 2 diabetes … Research shows that regular, brisk walking can reduce the risk of heart attack by the same amount as more vigorous exercise, such as jogging.”

Taking the initiative to implement and dedicate a portion of your leisure time to a regular workout routine is also an investment that will pay big rewards in terms of your overall health and happiness.

If you cannot find time to work out or don’t have the capability to go for long walks outside your residence, you should find creative ways to incorporate more movement into your activities. For example, dancing as you vacuum your living room burns far more calories than simply pushing the vacuum back and forth. You can also consider additional tips on ways to convert your sedentary lifestyle.

Solutions At Work

At work you should actively look for ways to be more physically active before sitting at your desk all day. Park farther away and take the stairs.

In addition, implement movement in your workflow. Productively changing positions frequently and taking small breaks from sitting is an important ergonomic principle that actually enhances your overall job satisfaction and productivity.

Personally investing, or encouraging your management to invest, in high quality office furniture that allows for sit-stand workflow is also important. This type of office furniture recognizes that work that honors movement and the full range of body motion is better not just for you, but for your company as well. VersaTables offers several sit-stand workstation options, and is also happy to provide custom furniture bids for your specific needs.

In addition to using ergonomically designed office furniture that promotes movement, you can also work to develop good work habits that include doing short, simple exercises at the desk. You could even walk to the water cooler a few times a day. Just tell your boss it might help prevent diabetes, and save you from an early grave.

Sedentary Lifestyle Linked to Heart Disease

PhysicalInactivityA quick glance over the course of human history evidences one great fact about the human body: it was built to move. Our early ancestors were nearly always on the move, and even as recently as 150 years ago, our agrarian society incorporated full body movement as part of the regular work day.

However, in the last 60 years, workers in the United States have progressively become more and more sedentary. Not just in their office work, but in their homes as well. In fact, some studies report that the average American adult spends between 9-12 hours a day simply sitting.

All that sitting around is taking more than a toll on our office and home furniture, it is taking a toll on our hearts.

The Link Between Sitting And Heart Disease

According to the New York State Department of Health, approximately 35% of US coronary heart disease mortality is due to physical inactivity. This number becomes even more sobering in light of the fact that coronary heart disease is also the leading cause of death in the United States, accounting for more than 700,000 deaths each year.

With only about 22% of the American population reporting that they engage in regular sustained physical activity, it seems likely this epidemic will only be on the rise.

Engaging in regular sustained physical activity (an activity of intensity lasting 30 minutes or more five times a week) significantly reduces your risk of dying prematurely from cardiovascular disease. It also helps you prevent developing diabetes, helps you maintain a healthy body weight and lowers your risk of developing hypertension—all of which would make you even more susceptible to coronary disease.

How We Have Arrived At This Point

Of course, our culture didn’t just up and become lazy one day, leading to an increase in heart trouble and disease. The social shift to a more sedentary lifestyle in both our home and workplaces has been a steady transition, ending with more and more individuals spending more and more time behind a desk and on the couch. Some of the major points influencing this shift?

The Advent of the Industrial Revolution

The invention of the cotton gin, by Eli Whitney, began the Industrial Revolution in the US. At the time, no one realized the massive change that machinery created in human health. In the past, long hours spent laboring in the fields or herding livestock were typical. However, after the Industrial Revolution, people worked in factories or offices, and mostly stood or sat. Calories expended became less over the decades, and obesity and diabetes rose.

Henry Ford’s Contribution

To make matters worse – at least in terms of physical health – the invention of the automobile changed the world of transportation. Certainly, no one would argue the advantages of the piston engine, or its impact for allowing food and goods to be transported great distances. However, personal transportation by auto superseded walking – particularly walking long distances. The physiological benefits of physical movement were lost.

Philo Farnsworth’s Invention

If the above factors weren’t enough, one other change greatly impacted human health: the television. Many decry the TV as one of the biggest causes for the rise in our sedentary lifestyles.

Americans spend significant amounts of leisure time watching TV, with some researchers suggesting we spend as much as 5 hours a day glued to the tube. A study mentioned in the Journal of the American Medical Association sheds light on this alarming trend and the impact it has on our health:

“While the associations between time spent viewing TV and risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease were linear, the risk of all-cause mortality appeared to increase with TV viewing duration of greater than 3 hours per day.”

Even the most diehard TV watchers can’t deny that sitting in front of the tube is damaging their health and creating a risk to life.

Solutions

In light of such facts, what can our culture do to stem the rising tide? The solution is simple; we must sit less and move more. However, living in a work and leisure culture that is primarily oriented toward sitting requires some effort to find ways to incorporate more movement into your routine.

Solutions At Home

When working to overcome a sedentary lifestyle at home, quite simply, you should just turn off the TV and walk. Walk for recreation, for exercise, and as a method of transportation.  According to WebMD:

“Cardiovascular or aerobic exercise is steady physical activity using large muscle groups. This type of exercise strengthens the heart and lungs and improves the body’s ability to use oxygen. Aerobic exercise has the most benefits for your heart. Over time, aerobic exercise can help decrease your heart rate and blood pressure and improve your breathing (since your heart won’t have to work as hard during exercise).”

Taking the initiative to implement and dedicate a portion of your leisure time to a regular workout routine is also an investment that will pay big rewards in terms of your overall health and happiness. Of course, you should always check with your personal physician before beginning a new exercise regimen.

If you cannot find time to work out or don’t have the capability to go for long walks outside your residence, you should find creative ways to incorporate more movement into your activities. For example, dancing as you vacuum your living room burns far more calories than simply pushing the vacuum back and forth. You can also consider additional tips on ways to convert your sedentary lifestyle.

Solutions At Work

At work you should actively look for ways to be more physically active before sitting at your desk all day. For instance, you can park farther away from your building’s entrance and take the stairs when walking into work.

In addition, you should implement movement in your workflow. Productively changing positions frequently and taking small breaks from sitting is an important ergonomic principle that actually enhances your overall job satisfaction and productivity.

Personally investing, or encouraging your management to invest, in high quality office furniture that allows for sit-stand workflow is also important. This type of office furniture recognizes that work that honors movement and the full range of body motion is better not just for you, but for your company as well. VersaTables offers several sit-stand workstation options, and is also happy to provide custom furniture bids for your specific needs.

In addition to using ergonomically designed office furniture that promotes movement, you can also work to develop good work habits that include doing short, simple exercises at the desk.

Sedentary Lifestyles Linked to Depression & Anxiety

At one time or another, most people will feel depressed or anxious. Events occur within our lives that temporarily alter our emotional well-being.  Ill health of a loved one, relationship struggles, or losing a job can make a person feel lonely, scared or anxious.  Experiencing these feelings after a traumatic event is very normal. However, some people experience these emotions on a daily basis and this is typically a result of an anxiety disorder, depression or both. These conditions can severely impact the sufferer’s ability to function in their normal, everyday home and workplace tasks.

It seems that our country faces an overwhelming epidemic of these mood disorders. And as researchers attempt to explain why, one interesting link stands out: we don’t move as much as we did 60 years ago.

Consider, for a moment, your average day. You likely spend eight to nine hours sitting in an office of some type, two more hours in your car and then you get home and collapse on the couch. If not at work or in your car, you might attend school or meetings where you sit, sit, sit.

The simple fact of the matter is that we sit too much between work and home, and it is taking a toll on our emotional health and well-being.

The Impact Sitting Has On Our Brain & Body

While the full causes of depression are not entirely understood, and may never be, one biological mechanism seems to play an important role in regulating our emotions and moods: serotonin.

Much research suggests that more serotonin is needed in order to effectively combat depression and anxiety. For this reason, most major anti-depressant medications contain doses of serotonin. A sedentary lifestyle does not actively promote the release of such important hormones. However, an active lifestyle does. According to Primer Magazine:

“Our brains are like an internal pharmacy, just stocked full of drugs. We just have to figure out how to unlock it. One of the most important keys to unlocking that internal pharmacy is exercise. When you exercise your body releases endorphins—your body’s natural ‘feel good’ neurotransmitters. Endorphins are ‘endogenous opioid peptides,’ the keyword there being opioid…Opioids are the world’s most powerful painkiller.”

If you shut off your movement, you shut off your supply of endorphins that help release important hormones like serotonin. 

Understanding the Symptoms of Depression and Anxiety

Depression is usually associated with a lethargic or low energy state. However, the depressed person can also carry a lot of anxiety. In fact, according to the Anxiety Disorders Association of America, almost 50% of people diagnosed with depression are diagnosed with an anxiety disorder as well.

Despite the link between the two disorders, depression and anxiety are not the same.  Depression is marked by feelings of hopelessness, anger, and despair. It can cause the sufferers energy level to be low, and cause them to feel overwhelmed by their daily tasks and personal relationships.

  • Symptoms of a depressive episode include:
    • Feeling of hopelessness
    • Persistent sad, anxious mood
    • Feelings of worthlessness or guilt
    • Insomnia or oversleeping
    • Loss of pleasure in hobbies and activities, including sex
    • Low appetite or overeating/weight loss or weight gain
    • Decreased energy
    • Thoughts of death or suicide
    • Irritability or restlessness
    • Physical symptoms that are persistent and do not respond to treatment i.e. headaches, digestive problems, or other unexplainable pains.

Depression is categorized in three main types – major depression, dysthymia, and bipolar disorder. Each of these may also occur with any of the anxiety disorders.

Anxiety disorders, on the other hand, lead a person to experience panic or fear in a situation that most people would not feel threatened by. The sufferers often live with a constant worry or a general feeling of anxiousness. In severe cases, this can affect the person’s ability to go about their normal life, have meaningful relationships or be successful at their job.

  • Symptoms of an anxiety disorder include:
    • Feelings of panic, fear or a general uneasiness
    • Repeated flashbacks or traumatic experiences
    • Uncontrollable, obsessive thoughts
    • Nightmares
    • Ritualistic Behaviors
    • Insomnia
    • Palpitations
    • Cold or sweaty hands and/or feet
    • Shortness of breath
    • Dry mouth
    • Nausea
    • Numbness in hands or feet
    • Inability to be calm and still
    • Dizziness
    • Muscle Tension

Panic Disorder, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, and specific phobias are all types of anxiety disorders. There is also a “generalized anxiety disorder.”Further Reading:

 

Many people who are diagnosed with depression have a history of an anxiety disorder at some earlier point in their life. No evidence exists that one disorder leads to the other, but it is clear that many people suffer from both.

Depression in the Workplace

Next to the costs associated with repetitive injuries, clinical depression has become one of America’s most costly illnesses, costing the US economy more than $51 billion in absenteeism from work and $26 billion in direct treatment costs—according to Mental Health America.

To make matters more disheartening, many depressed employees will not seek treatment because they fear the affect it will have on their job and they are concerned about confidentiality.

Clearly, the emotional and economical costs of depression and anxiety are too great to ignore. How can you combat these conditions in your home and in your workplace?

Solutions

It is important that you learn to recognize the symptoms of depression and anxiety discussed above. Should you find yourself experiencing such symptoms, you should immediately consult expert help and consider some simple lifestyle adjustments that may help improve your mood.

Solutions At Home

When working to overcome a sedentary lifestyle at home, quite simply, you should just turn off the TV and exercise.

When you hear the term “exercise” you might think about pumping weights or running laps around the gym. However, many different activities boost your physical intensity to help positive endorphins and hormones flow through your body. Certainly playing sports, running or spending time on your treadmill counts as exercise; but so does gardening, strolling around the neighborhood or washing your car. Anything that gets you moving will help improve your mood.

According to the Mayo Clinic, exercise can help you:

  • Gain confidence. Meeting exercise goals or challenges, even small ones, can boost your self-confidence. Getting in shape can also make you feel better about your appearance.
  • Take your mind off worries. Exercise is a distraction that can get you away from the cycle of negative thoughts that feed anxiety and depression.
  • Get more social interaction. Exercise may give you the chance to meet or socialize with others. Just exchanging a friendly smile or greeting as you walk around your neighborhood can help your mood.
  • Cope in a healthy way. Doing something positive to manage anxiety or depression is a healthy coping strategy. Trying to feel better by drinking alcohol, dwelling on how badly you feel, or hoping anxiety or depression will go away on their own can lead to worsening symptoms.

Taking the initiative to implement and dedicate a portion of your leisure time to a regular workout routine is also an investment that will pay big rewards in terms of your overall health and happiness.

If you cannot find time to work out, you should find creative ways to incorporate more movement into your activities. For example, dancing as you vacuum your living room burns far more calories and releases more positive hormones than simply pushing the vacuum back and forth. You can also consider additional tips on ways to convert your sedentary lifestyle.

Solutions At Work

At work you should intentionally look for ways to be more physically active before sitting at your desk all day. Park farther away from your office entrance and take the stairs.

In addition, implement movement in your workflow. Productively changing positions frequently and taking small breaks from sitting is an important ergonomic principle that actually enhances your overall job satisfaction and productivity.

Personally investing, or encouraging your management to invest, in high quality office furniture that allows for sit-stand workflow is also important. This type of office furniture recognizes that work that honors movement and the full range of body motion is better not just for your mental and physcial health, but for your company as well. VersaTables offers several sit-stand workstation options, and is also happy to provide custom furniture bids for your specific needs.

In addition to using ergonomically designed office furniture that promotes movement, you can also work to develop good work habits that include doing short, simple exercises at the desk.

14 Simple Ways to Convert Your Sedentary Lifestyle

It’s no secret that we need to sit less and move more. Our leisure and work habits have become far too sedentary, especially compare to the generations that came before us. And the less we move, the more we put ourselves at risk for developing serious health consequences, including, but not limited to, heart disease, diabetes, anxiety and depression and a premature death.

Of course, the standard solution to this sitting-epidemic on our country is to simply hold and honor a gym membership with regular, strenuous workouts. But for most of us, as soon as life becomes more hectic and deadlines from work become more impending, the gym membership is usually the first thing that is kicked to the curb.

What we need are more ways to incorporate full range movement into our daily activities and routines at work and home. It is easier than you might think. The following tips provide perfect ways to move your sedentary lifestyle to more active one.

1. Park Far Away

Though it is nearly instinctual to try and find a parking place as close to our destination as possible, by doing so we miss out on a great opportunity to incorporate more movement into our daily activities. You should try to develop a habit of parking a block away from your destination, or at least in the parking slot the furthest from the door.

2. Take The Stairs Instead of The Elevators

If you have to travel up only one or two flights of stairs to reach your destination, you should always take the stairs. If you need to go up and down several floors, then you should use both the stairs and the elevator. Walk up or down two flights, then ride the elevator the rest of the way. As you become increasingly physically active and physically fit, you can increase the number of flights you climb or descend.

3. If It is Possible, Walk or Bike to Work

This manner of commuting to work may not be possible for everyone, but if it is an option for you, you do stand to benefit greatly from taking the initiative and adopting this more physically advantageous form of transportation. Supporting such movement with ergonomic products like quality walking shoes or a quality bike will help you move with the most comfort and safety.

4. Skip Your Stop

If you utilize a public transportation system like a bus, transit car or subway, consider skipping the stop closest to your destination and opting instead for the stop just before or after. Walk to your destination from this point.

5. Maximize The Benefits From Your Grocery Trip

When making a trip to the grocery store, get the most mileage out of your errand by walking up and own each aisle.

6. Take Short Breaks At Work

It is important to build rest and restorative periods into your work routine. These periods give you the opportunity to stretch tired muscles, relieving muscle fatigue and tension. Use these breaks to perform purposeful stretches and to take short walks.

7. Do Your Own Yard Work

Instead of hiring someone to the heavy lifting in your yard, do it yourself. Mowing and trimming your lawn each week is a great way to sneak in a little outdoor exercise and it will save you money too!

8. Play With Your Kids

Sedentary lifestyles are not only prevalent among adults, but they are nearly epidemic among what should be the most active part of our population: kids. Today’s children watch more TV and play more video games. So get your kids up and moving by playing ball or some old fashioned night-games in the yard. Doing so is good for all of you.

9. Put On Your Favorite Music And Dance

This is a great way to unwind at the end of a long day, plus the extra movement helps your blood flow better and your heart beat faster.

10. While Watching TV, Pace or Stretch

Just as it is important to break up the sitting periods you experience in your workplace, it is equally important to break up the sitting periods you experience in your home. Instead of just switching the channel during commercial breaks take that time to walk quickly around your house or do some simple stretching exercises. If you really want to maximize the physical possibilities of your tube time, invest in a treadmill and walk while you watch your favorite shows.

11. Choose to Physically Visit Colleagues, Instead of Just Calling or Emailing

At work, when you have a question or need to relay information to a colleague, instead of picking up the phone or sending them an email, take a moment to walk over to their office or cubicle. This provides not only an important rest break, but also enhances the chances for collaborative brainstorming and fortuitous conversations that can increase productivity.

12. Walk While You Talk

If your work or home routines involve spending significant amounts of time on the phone, you can make the most of that time by walking as you talk. Rather than just sitting at your desk, you should get in the habit of pacing. Motion and movement actually increase our brains’ ability to process and retain information, so you stand to gain enhanced efficiency and productivity from this choice.

13. Choose Active Entertainment Over Passive Entertainment

When divvying up your leisure time, choose where and how you spend it carefully. For example, instead of going to a movie you could choose to go and play tennis with some friends. Instead of playing with a traditional gaming system, why not play with an interactive system like a Wii? Rather than meet friends for a night cap, why not catch up over and evening walk instead?

14. Choose Active Vacations

As you implement more movement into your daily routines at work and at home, your desire to be more active will increase. You can also benefit from beginning to view vacations as opportunities to be even further active. Instead of planning a retreat to a spa, plan to revitalize your mind and body by hiking. Rather than taking in a new city by driving around, walk the downtown area. When golfing, walk the course rather than ride in a gold cart. If staying at a resort, make use of their pool and fitness center. Once you begin looking, the possibilities for plugging more movement into your leisure time are endless.

Sit-Stand Work

Certainly, one of the biggest culprits leading to our cultural sitting epidemic is the old grindstone, the nine-to-five, the job. Most of us work from a sedentary position, but we do not have too. In fact, your workflow, creativity and efficiency can greatly benefit from working in this manner. Sit-Stand workflow promotes more full range movement during your work routine, helping you to burn more calories, promote good blood circulation and activate important chemicals in your brain.

Facilitating this superior type of workflow is easiest when using office equipment that is designed to support such movement. The flexibility and adaptability of products like VersaTables’ Versa Center 24 Wide or their Dual Fusion Computer Cart, provide the perfect arrangements for this type of working routine.

We Aren’t Meant To Only Sit

If you already spend your working day behind a desk, at a computer, you already know that you are at an increased risk for developing a repetitive stress injury, like Carpal Tunnel Syndrome. However, you may not know that you are also at risk of another serious danger: prolonged sitting.

It might not sound threatening on the surface, but sitting for extensive periods of time, with the absence of full body motion is what some are referring to as “the silent killer.” Sitting too much and too long makes you more likely to develop heart disease, diabetes, depression and anxiety—all of which can lead to a premature death.

In fact, in July 2010, The American Cancer Society published a study reporting exactly this. After examining 123,000 participants, and considering the amount of time each spent sitting and engaging in physical activity, they found women who were inactive and sat more than 6 hours per day had a 94% higher risk of dying during the study than their counterparts who were more physically active and sat less than 3 hours per day.

How To Combat The Sitting Disease

While there are many small ways that you can incorporate more movement into your day, special attention and consideration should be given to the way your work. After all, you likely spend 8-9 hours sitting just at work. And research suggests that after only 4 of those hours, when sitting continuously, the body goes into a sort of “sleep mode.” In this state, the genes that regulate the amount of glucose and fat in the body start to shut down, circulation slows and oxygen flow can slow as well.

This change occurs at the physiological level in our bodies simply because at the genetic level, our bodies are programmed to move. And the simple fact of the matter is that they function better when moving. So our mission becomes to find more ways to move during our workday. A sit-stand work routine may provide the best solution.

The Benefits of Sit-Stand Work

If you spend your day working behind a desk, one of the simplest, non-exercise activities that you can incorporate directly into your workflow is the act of standing. While it might not seem like much happens when you stand up, standing up is literally a wake-up call for your body.

When using a professional sit-stand workstation, there are many posture possibilities and combinations available to you. And this subtle continuation of shifting posture and position has many benefits. Including, but certainly not limited to:

  • Strengthens muscles in the leg, ankle and foot
  • Improves balance
  • Mitigates formation of blood clots in the legs
  • Promotes better circulation, especially through veins in the legs
  • Reduces risk of cardiovascular disease
  • Improves alertness
  •  Encourages movement
  • Discourages “mindless” snacking
  • Allows for deep breathing and better oxygen flow through the body
  • Increases good HDL cholesterol levels
  • Decreases bad LDL cholesterol levels
  • Promotes weight loss
  • Offers a more neutral position for the back
  • Is a natural posture
  • Is less fatiguing than sitting

Sit-stand workflow is able to promote these positive impacts because it engages all of the body’s physiological systems.

Sit-Stand Workstations

Leading the revolution for the way we work, VersaTables is proud to offer high quality workstations that facilitate sit-stand work.

From our Sentry Floor Mount Computer Station, to our Versa Center Series, to our Dual Fusion Computer Cart, we have conceptualized and carry a large selection of sit-stand furniture solutions that are perfect for a variety of environments. Whether you work from home, in a business plaza, medical facility, government department or educational institution, our sustainable products will enable healthy and efficient workflow.

Further, you can best personalize your sit-stand work station by using our Workstation Planner Tool.

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